Rian Johnson Hints At More Force Shenanigans

George Simpson from express.co.uk reports on a question about Dark Side Force Ghosts that was asked of Rian:

Speaking with LA Times, he said: “I think that would be interesting. We haven’t seen them in the movies as far as I can remember.”

Johnson continued: “But that would be really interesting considering the dark side is about self-preservation, trying to find immortality, and the notion that the light side actually got to it through selflessness, what would the dark side version of that look like? There’s so much cool [stuff] to think about if you’re willing to open your head a little bit!”

He continued: “The truth is, because Star Wars until The Force Awakens has been set in amber and we hadn’t had a new Star Wars movie in 10 years, you forget that they were introducing new Force stuff with each movie, based on the requirements of the story.

“Force-grabbing didn’t come around until Empire [Strikes Back], it wasn’t in A New Hope. Same with Force ghosts.”

Johnson added: “They’d introduce new ideas of what could happen with the Force each time…The one point where we do introduce a bit of a twist in terms of Force ghosts is where Yoda calls down the lightning onto the tree.

“That, I think, is a tantalising hint of the potential of someone who is a Force ghost interacting with the real world.”

Rian

Rian’s head is open to whatever Kathleen Kennedy puts into it.

Is this the year that Marvel’s superheroes finally topple Star Wars?

That’s the question that Michael Cavna at The Washington Post asks:

IS THIS the year that Marvel finally tops Star Wars?

Judging by early box-office figures and a new Fandango movie poll, this could indeed be the turning point when the Avengers prove more popular than the Rebel Alliance.

Ever since Disney-owned Lucasfilm rebooted the space movie franchise in 2015, the biggest Star Wars film of each year has outdistanced the biggest release from Disney-owned Marvel Studios.

This year, however, Marvel has come loaded for bear.

Hurtling toward summer, “Black Panther” remains the year’s biggest film by a long shot, having grossed $676 million domestically — a high bar to cross for any Star Wars film being released this far along into the franchise.

But the plot twist is, this month’s “Avengers: Infinity War” is tracking even higher than “Black Panther.” The mobile-ticketing platform Fandango announced last week that “Infinity War” was outselling the past seven Marvel Cinematic Universe movies — combined — in presale tickets.

Fandango follows that announcement up this week with news of a seasonal blockbuster survey that polled 4,500 fans. According to the ticketing site, the season’s most anticipated release is “Infinity War” (opening April 27), followed by “Deadpool 2” (May 18), with “Solo: A Star Wars Story” (May 25) sliding into third place ahead of “Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom” (June 22).

When “Infinity War” opens next week, it will try to top the $248 million opening weekend of “The Force Awakens” (the biggest domestic debut before adjusting for inflation). Star Wars is not going to give up any box-office crowns easily. (Current projections have “Infinity War” opening as high as $235 million.)

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Running Out Of Legacy Characters To Urinate On, Lucasfilm Might Be Scavenging The EU for Episode IX

CAUTION: RUMORS & SPECULATION

Thathashtagshow.com reports:

Abrams, along with casting director Nina Gold, who has worked on both Episode VII and Episode VIII, are searching for a female lead, 40-50 years old, to play the role of “MARA.” It’s common practice for film’s to use code names during the casting process, and that could be the case here. To be clear, we’re only able to confirm that they are looking to fill the role of a female lead who they are calling “MARA.”

To fans of the EU, however, the possibility that Abrams is bringing Mara Jade to the big screen in Episode IX is absolutely mind-blowing. Created by Timothy Zahn in the once-but-not-now-canon novel Heir to the Empire, published in 1991, Mara Jade is a character that carries a special importance to a generation of fans who only had the EU novels to quench their Star Wars thirst. Originally the Hand of Emperor Palpatine, Jade, a powerful Force user in her own right, was sent to kill Luke Skywalker. Skywalker was able to not only escape death but to break Palpatine’s posthumous power over Jade. The two went on to marry, have children and train a new generation of Jedi.

Thathashtagshow.com’s video mentions that Lucasfilm is looking for a female in her 40s or 50s to play the “Mara” role.

Many have mentioned that Epsisode IX was to focus on Leia, just as Episode VII had focused on Han, and Episode VIII had focused on Luke.  If this is true, then the death of Carrie Fisher would necessitate a retooling of the Episode IX script.  It might be easier to retool Leia’s dialogue in Episode IX for legacy EU character Mara Jade, rather than to just start from scratch.  But that is pure speculation on my part.

Mara

Be prepared to watch Mara Jade die in the most degrading manner possible.

SJW Attempts To Shame Normal Person

Remember Neil Harrington?  He’s the wise sage from dorksideoftheforce.com who called for everyone in fandom to just get along.

What’s he doing now?  Well, he’s now got a new piece up at fansided entitled, Crybaby Star Wars fan’s boycotting Solo: A Star Wars Story due to ‘feminazi agenda’ of Star Wars.

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Gee, I never read anyone refer to Backlashers as crybabies before.  How original.

In his article Neil comments on a very well articulated YouTube video which can be seen here:

Neil stupidly writes:

A crybaby, Star Wars fan is boycotting Solo: A Star Wars Story for all the wrong reasons, proving once again how out of touch with reality some people genuinely are.

Let’s get something straight here.  SJWs are wholly unqualified to comment on the nature of reality.  This of course is because their modern ideology originally stumbled out of the LSD-laden piss holes of Woodstock back in the late 1960s.  So their entire ideology is founded on distortion of reality.  But Neil continues anyway.

Solo: A Star Wars Story is nearly a month away, and many Star Wars fans are excited about another film within a galaxy far, far away. Others, not so much — and that’s okay.

As long as they’re not interested in it for reasons that you approve of apparently.

Meanwhile, a Star Wars “YouTuber” is not happy with the direction of what he has termed “Disney’s Star Wars,” making a “look at me” video in response.

“Look at me” is the whole point of the video format.  It’s a visual medium at which people look.

Before I get started, I want to make something (kyber) crystal clear.

Self-appointed authority and massive stupidity always walks hand in hand.  It’s a universal constant.  How’s that for crystal clarity?

It’s perfectly acceptable to not like all of the Star Wars content. That’s not the point of this response, not in the slightest. It’s the reasonings and entitlement of some Star Wars fans, like this guy, that’s garnered this response.

So it’s perfectly acceptable to not like all of the Star Wars content, as long as people don’t like the content for reasonings that you approve of.  Got it.  Who exactly appointed you to make this determination for everyone else?

Honestly, the only people that I’ve seen express entitlement, are the SJWs who have been screaming their moronic demands for equal representation and gender equality to Disney ever since George Lucas sold his company.  Normal people were always perfectly fine with accepting whatever stories that George Lucas wanted to tell in whatever form they took, warts and all.

Also, his hateful remarks about women really got my Midichlorians boiling.

His hateful remarks about women are a figment of your imagination.  He never made any such “hateful” remarks.

Though, I have to admit, I’d be interested to see what happens to your blood boiling point when you read one of my “Vagi-Chlorian” comments.

Also, this particular fanboy is making all sorts of claims against Disney and its direction which are flat out wrong.

Actually, it’s your own comments that are flat out wrong.  And I’m happy to correct you.

Right off the bat, the camera angles and long, dramatic shots of Gabriel (the creator of this video) walking languidly up and down bleachers show what this video is really about. It’s about him. It’s not about presenting a topic of conversation or facilitating a civil debate. He wants us to look at him and, Gabriel, you’ve got your wish.

Well yeah.  He’s about to express his opinion.  So it is about him, and how he feels towards the Star Wars franchise.  What exactly is wrong with that?   I mean, besides nothing whatsoever.

“Never thought I’d say this, but I’m boycotting Solo: A Star Wars Story. The only way to get Star Wars back to where it was, is to simply say. No.”

Cool, bro. You don’t have to see it. No one is “Forcing” you to do so.

He never claimed that anyone was forcing him to see the film.  So why would you respond to a comment that he never made?

“Disney continues to shove down their SJW feminazi agenda down our retinas.” 

You mean creating characters, such as Daisy Ridley’s Rey, meant to empower women is a bad thing? Women holding an equal place within the Star Wars universe is bad? I don’t know where you get your delusions, laser brain.

Well no.  He doesn’t mean that creating characters, such as Mary Sue Rey, meant to empower women is a bad thing.  That’s why the sentence that he actually spoke doesn’t contain those words in that order.  He also didn’t say that holding an equal place within the Star Wars universe is bad either.  That also is a fabrication of your own making.  So the reason that you don’t understand where he gets his “delusions,” is that you’re consistently responding to points that he’s not making.

Rather, what he did say instead, was that, “Disney continues to shove down their SJW feminazi agenda down our retinas.”  Pay particular note to how the sentence that you wrote, and the sentence that he spoke, contain different words.  This of course means that the two sentences contain different meanings and intent.

It’s always important to respond to what people actually say and write, rather than to respond to what you wish they had said and written, just because you have some well-rehearsed pre-fabricated counterpoint to recite.

Why would he even make such a comment when women have had an equal place in Star Wars from the very beginning, for 40 years now?

The real problem as I see it is that women, or more accurately feminists, are more equal than others in the current state of the franchise.  A great reason to abandon it for something else that SJWs will barnacle to in 40 years.

Gabriel even claims that he’s not sexist.

Um, yes you are. News flash: if you use the term “feminazi” you’re a sexist.

Um, no.  He isn’t.  News Flash: feminist ideology and the female gender are no longer inextricably linked in the 21st Century.  This of course is thanks to male progressives who now claim to be feminists.  So criticism of the pure idiocy of modern feminist ideology does not automatically translate into criticism of women.

The recent trend of inclusion within a galaxy far, far away is a necessity (true there is still room for improvement, but they’re moving in the right direction) and kudos to Kathleen Kennedy for embracing it. Speaking of which, he lets the President of Lucasfilm have it.

Recent trend?  Where have you uneducated SJWs been for the last 40 yearsAre you even remotely aware that it’s 2018, and not 1968?

He goes on to complain that Rey is powerful “without any training,” and that any character can now be powerful for no reason. You mean like Anakin Skywalker, who is mysteriously created by the Force?

Well no.  Anakin had a strong connection with the Force.  But he still received training from Obi-Wan.  That was the whole point of the Prequel Trilogy.  Anakin was Obi-Wan’s apprentice.  Have you watched the films?

A nobody, like Rey?

Ha!  Aren’t you going to be surprised when JJ Abrams retcons that in Episode IX and makes Rey Luke’s niece.

Or, Luke Skywalker, who was able to blow up the Death Star with five minutes of training with an aging Jedi?

Well that’s a pretty stupid argument.  Luke’s ability to blow up the Death Star had little to do with Jedi training.

Luke flew his T-16 back home on Tatooine through Beggar’s Canyon in which he shot womp rats which were about as big as the exhaust port on the Death Star.  That effectively acted as a real world simulation of the Death Star Run.  This was all stated by Luke during the presentation to the pilots showing them how to attack the Death Star.  Obi-Wan’s voice guided him through at the end, but primarily to encourage Luke to believe in his own abilities and experience.

Again, have you watched the films?

If you’re going to criticize Rey, then you have to slam the Skywalkers, too.

No, you don’t.  Not if you’ve actually watched all the films.

When we first meet Luke, he’s a naive inexperienced farm boy, who complains about wanting to hang out with friends, gets scolded by his Uncle, gets knocked unconscious by a Tusken Raider, gets pushed down in a bar by a drunkard, has to be defended by an elderly Jedi, gets insulted and his hand slapped by Han, gets insulted by Leia, gets mauled by a Wampa, gets shot down in his snowspeeder by an AT-AT, crash lands on a swamp planet, and gets his hand cut off during his very first lightsaber duel.

Not Rey though. She gets to skip the first phase of the hero’s journey so hear her roar! Somehow, she can pilot the Millennium Falcon and use a lightsaber all without any training at all. Sure she fumbles a bit getting the Falcon off the ground, but in only a couple of minutes, she’s evading Tie Fighters and deftly flying through the tight spaces of wrecked Star Destroyers. Not only is she Han Solo, but she’s Luke Skywalker too! Effectively fighting off a trained Knight of Ren, whatever that is, in her very first lightsaber battle. But don’t you dare question her girl power you misogynist, even though it doesn’t leave much left for Finn to shine with.

If your only criticisms are leveled at the female characters who receive the exact same character development as the male characters…that’s sexist.

They didn’t receive the exact same character development.  Watching the films makes this self evident.

He even claims Disney delayed the novel and Blu-ray release due to “plot holes” in The Last Jedi. Really, now? How did you get that insider information, Gabriel?

Reading the novels and comics is insider information now?  Anyone who can rub two brain cells together can see from the released material in novels and comics that they are being used to plug up what some call plot holes.  It’s transparent.

Don’t present opinion and conjecture as fact.

See the above linked facts.

The plans for both releases were well known before The Last Jedi premiered (we even wrote up an article on it); and before the complaints of some fans.

Great.  That doesn’t change the nature of the actual material within those releases.

Of course, Disney wants to make money. They only forked out $4 billion to buy the franchise. That does not mean that they aren’t committed to producing high-quality films or that they don’t care about the franchise whatsoever. If you don’t like the material, don’t buy it. You’re a real hero for doing your small part to take down Disney!

Well, that’s the real trick, isn’t it?  But let’s be perfectly honest here.  What you’re doing is attempting to shame this man into financially supporting a political agenda you approve of, and at the same time trying to discourage others from following in his footsteps.  You’re doing this, because you’re painfully aware that there aren’t enough of you SJW dimwits to financially support the franchise yourselves.

But, Gabriel’s complaint that Ehrenreich doesn’t sound or look anything like Harrison Ford, thus making him unworthy of being Han Solo, is ridiculous.

Far from being ridiculous, convincing the audience that Alden is Han Solo is the biggest challenge this film has.  One that could have been easily overcome by simply casting the right man.

Ron Howard has been very clear that he wasn’t looking for Ehrenreich to give his imitation of Ford, but present us with his own take on the character. He doesn’t have to sound or look exactly like Ford — Ehreinech needs to embrace his inner scoundrel.

Sure, Ron Howard has been very clear on that.  But it doesn’t matter if Ron Howard has been very clear on that.  What matters in the end, is how the audience perceives the work.

Last and certainly not least. The “boycott” on Solo: A Star Wars Story isn’t actually a boycott. Gabriel says that he might see it once it comes on Blu-ray DVD. So, how is that a boycott (you keep using that word but I don’t think it means what you think it means)? Your 11-minute video, Gabriel, has more plot holes than any movie you complained about.

The non-boycott “boycott” is proof that this Star Wars fanboy is out of touch with reality and displays, in a nutshell, all that’s wrong within the fanbase of a galaxy far, far away.

He’s not going to see it theatrically.  That’s a theatrical boycott.  So you shouldn’t be lecturing others about the definitions of words, when you yourself don’t understand the ones that you’re typing out.

Heck, it’s clear that you haven’t even watched the films, so you really shouldn’t be commenting on them very much at all.

But here’s the bottom line:

Normal people don’t organize boycotts in the same frenzied manner that SJW savages do.  Sure occasionally a few of the normals try to start a boycott when they’re passionate about something.  But generally speaking, normal people will simply shrug their shoulders, and walk away from the franchise.  No organizing will be necessary.  SJW politics will do all the heavy lifting in pushing normal people away from the franchise.

In fact, the box office and the waning merchandise and toy sales demonstrate that this has already begun.

UPDATE:

The talented filmmaker who created Gabriel’s video has posted his own response to Neil Harrington’s dorksideoftheforce.com article:

UPDATE:

The brilliant Ethan Van Sciver just took Harrington’s article on:

UPDATE:

Gabriel provides a follow up video:

UPDATE:

Jeremy from Geeks + Gamers adds his own commentary:

SJWs Predictably Unsatisfied

As predicted, SJWs are using the hiring of Victoria Mahoney as a soapbox to push their moronic politics.  They certainly can’t be happy just celebrating the inclusion of a woman of color.  Because also predictably, there’s plenty of fashionably bigoted remarks against white men which are all the rage among the SJW ignorati these days.

Behind the camera, the writers and directors of all eight Star Wars films have almost exclusively been white men.

Normally, the hiring of a second-unit director — responsible mainly for shots that don’t feature the major characters — wouldn’t be newsworthy. However, Lucasfilm has been on the receiving end of some negative attention for hiring a steady stream of white male writer-directors for its biggest Star Wars projects, including Abrams for The Force Awakens and Episode IX; Gareth Edwards for Rogue One; Ron Howard (replacing previous white dudes Phil Lord and Christopher Miller) for Solo; Rian Johnson for The Last Jedi and an upcoming film trilogy; Game of Thrones creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss for another upcoming trilogy, and Jon Favreau for the first live-action Star Warsseries. 

~Gwynne Watkins, Yahoo Entertaiment

George Lucas is out of the scene, and Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy has shepherded in a new crop of directors to steer this mighty ship. So far, the results have been mixed, and much has been made of the internal conflicts and firings. Yet throughout all this, there has been a constant: all of the directors have been white men. Whether they stuck around or not, every name chosen by Kennedy has fit that painfully narrow mold. Mahoney is a refreshing exception, but as a second unit director, she still won’t get to be the brains of the operation.

~Kayleigh Donaldson, SyFy Wire

Putting a black woman in charge of a Star Wars film’s second unit is an incredibly important step in the right direction toward diversifying the latent pool that studios tap into the helm major projects—and making Hollywood a more inclusive space overall. But it’s important to bear in mind that there’s still a lot of work to be done, because one black woman heading up one Star Wars film’s second unit will not solve the industry’s larger issue of excluding people who are not straight white men from positions of power. 

~Charles Pulliam-Moore, i09.com

While the ever-expanding movie franchise has been taken to task plenty of times for its repeated hiring of exactly one type of filmmaker — white males, including recent turns from Ron Howard and Rian Johnson — “The Force Awakens” director J.J. Abrams is bringing someone brand new into the fold: filmmaker Victoria Mahoney.

~Kate Erbland, IndieWire.com

J.J. Abrams is walking the walk, not just talking the talk. There’s a lot of discussion in Hollywood right now about inclusion, and opening up positions that are traditionally held by white men to a more diverse range of individuals.

Not to mention the fact that white male directors who make a $5 million Sundance indie are handed the reigns to massive franchises like Star Wars or a Marvel movie straight away.

~Adam Chitwood, Collider

The news was trumpeted today by filmmaker Ava DuVernay, a friend of the film’s top director, J.J. Abrams, who was clearly thrilled at the thought of a black woman making inroads in a franchise that’s frequently struggled to get people who aren’t white men in leading positions behind the camera.

~William Hughes, AV Club

Following criticism that every Star Wars director has been a white male, Lucasfilm has done a game changer, announcing Victoria Mahoney as the Second Unit Director for Star Wars 9. Mahoney will be the first African American and first female director to work as any kind of director on a Star Wars movie, so this is a historic move for Lucasfilm.

The criticism of Lucasfilm and Star Wars first surfaced earlier this year when Variety reported a statistic that 96% of the writers and directors for Star Wars are white males.

~Trevor Norkey, MovieWeb.com

Some people are increasingly critical of the film industry for being composed primarily of white men. Star Wars has dealt with a lot of this rage since all of the franchise’s films have been helmed by white men. However, it appears they are starting to turn that image around to be more diverse both in front of and behind the camera.

~Tomy Williams, geekyrant.com

Patton

“If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.” ~ George S. Patton

Yes, Episode IX is off to a fine start.

 

Will Episode IX’s 2nd Unit Director Satisfy SJW Demands?

Recently, JJ Abrams was quoted as saying:

“I know that Kathy Kennedy is deeply aware of and actively working to do the right thing in this regard,” responded Abrams. “There’s no question that ‘Star Wars’ will benefit from the women writers and directors that will inevitably be telling those stories, too.”

“And I cannot wait to see and I just know that the stories that will be told in that universe from a more diverse set of writers and directors will be thrilling and the best chapters in that story. I know that is something that Kathy is actively working on.”

Rian Johnson was recently quoted as saying:

“We need some directors who aren’t white dudes,” he said emphatically, in spite of Lucasfilm’s track record to date of hiring only white male directors. “And [Kennedy] knows it, too. It just has to happen. I mean, come on. It has to happen.”

Some have speculated that women haven’t been hired to direct yet due to Kathleen Kennedy herself feeling threatened by other strong women in the industry.

Well hold on to your little social justice hats.

The SJW favorite for directing a Star Wars film, Ava DuVernay, just wasn’t interested in the franchise.  But she is interested in making a big announcement about JJ Abrams pick for 2nd Unit Director.  She tweeted recently tweeted the following announcement:

Getinmedia.com defines the 2nd Unit Director as such:

The second unit of a film is a crew that is responsible for shooting supplementary footage; this includes establishing shots, stunts, inserts, and cutaways. This crew is separate from the first unit, which is the team that films scenes with the leading cast. When a series of shots are deemed too expensive, dangerous, or time-consuming for the first unit to accomplish, the second unit director leads his or her team to capture the necessary scenes.

How often are the hirings of 2nd Unit Film directors publicly announced with fanfare?  Almost never.  So why now?

Well, given that all of the major future Star Wars projects have been awarded to “white dudes,” Lucasfilm has been under pressure to establish some social justice street cred and make good on their repeated promises.  Particularly after Kennedy was raked over the coals by her own SJW allies over the hiring of Jon Favreau.

Will this satisfy SJW demands?  Nothing ever does.

Victoria Mahoney may or may not produce fine work.  Unfortunately, the answer to that question will be forever tainted by the politics of Disney/Lucasfilm’s Diversity Fashion Show.

Let’s just hope that if Episode IX isn’t well received, that Victoria doesn’t react in the same way that Ava DuVernay did over heavy criticism of A Wrinkle In Time:

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If you don’t like it, you too may be accused of being racist, sexist, and/or misogynist against the 2nd Unit Director.

Liberal Wanted The Last Jedi To Be More Liberal

Ian Harris writes a piece in The Michigan Daily entitled, ‘The Last Jedi’ and the state of film criticism.

But what I take even more of an issue with than the film itself is the discussion surrounding it.

I find myself in the same place, but for different reasons.

The originals are generally loved and the prequels generally loathed, with “The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One” both falling somewhere in the pretty-good-or-maybe-great-but-not-amazing range.

I’d have to disagree.  Rather, it seems to be the Sequel Trilogy that is now generally loathed, with the Prequel Trilogy having mixed opinions.

Before it was released in theaters worldwide, “The Last Jedi” boasted a stellar 94 percent on the critical aggregate site Rotten Tomatoes. That number has since gone down to a still impressive 90 percent. But for whatever reason, audiences didn’t take to the film in the same way. The audience score on the same website currently sits at a middling 49 percent, the worst ever for a “Star Wars” picture. 

That reason is politics.  As the recent Oscars demonstrated, those working within the industry are ruled by the political fashions of the day.  It affects absolutely everything they do.  Critics are no different; they have based their reviews of the film on the political lectures they received which they found agreeable, to the exclusion of genuine film craft considerations.

But rather than a productive debate about the merits of the movie’s themes, commentary on its characters or possibly what it was actually trying to say and whether or not it succeeded in it, much of the discussion that surrounds “The Last Jedi” resembles that of a political debate or a Twitter feud between celebrities.

That’s because the Star Wars franchise has now become the latest skirmish in the much larger cold culture civil war.

One of the prominent narratives that surrounds this film is that the people who don’t like “The Last Jedi” don’t like it for one of the following reasons: All of its main characters are either women or people of color, it doesn’t respect white males and makes all the male characters stupid and they can’t let go of the old “Star Wars” they remember from when they are kids.

That of course is entirely incorrect.  No such narrative exists, prominent or otherwise.  Rather, that is a purely imaginary point that SJWs have wholly fabricated in order to have something to argue against, in an effort to defend the political messaging in the film.

Think about this logically for a moment.

What sense would it make for long time fans to be upset over the inclusion of female or non-white characters, when both female and non-white characters have been in Star Wars throughout its entire 40 year history, going back to the very beginning.

What sense would it make for any fans to be upset over the inclusion of female or non-white characters so suddenly with The Last Jedi, when its predecessor The Force Awakens was generally well received?  Why would they suddenly become enraged over such things now?

Of course it doesn’t make any sense, which is why SJWs believe it to be true.  None of what Harris is contending here has any basis in factual reality.  I understand that SJWs believe that it’s still 1968, and really want it to be.  But in reality it’s actually 2018.  These battles were fought and won 40 years ago or more.

Now let me preface this by saying that by no means are these the only criticisms being leveled at the film’s detractors, but they are the ones making the loudest splash and the ones that are most dangerous for allowing us to have a meaningful discussion about the film itself.

No.  What’s actually making the loudest splash are the SJWs arguing against these non-existent points, much in the same way that they virtue signaled one another over the equally imaginary black stormtrooper controversy.

That’s one of the more fascinating aspects of SJW psychopathology.  SJWs are compelled to argue against points that no one is making.

One article that was making the rounds over this past weekend was titled “Why So Many Men Hate ‘The Last Jedi’ But Can’t Agree on Why.”

Yes, I’ve commented on that silly article.

The author’s argument essentially boils down to this: “Because there is no central criticism of this film that everyone agrees upon, the reason people don’t like it must be sexism.”  She points to the prequel films as examples of films everyone agrees are bad for the same specific reasons and uses that to explain that if “The Last Jedi” were actually a bad movie, everyone would have the same criticisms of it.

To which I explain:

Not necessarily.  This assumes that there’s a heated disagreement as to why The Last Jedi is bad.  Rather, what this merely shows is that there’s multiple reasons why The Last Jedi is bad.  Moreover, movie viewers are allowed to have differing opinions as to why they might not like a film, just as they are allowed to have differing opinions as to why they might like a film.  This really isn’t evidence of anything more than the existence of differing opinions.  Differing opinions are what happens when people aren’t forced to comply with the consensus of the collective.

“If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn’t thinking.” ~George Patton

Ian continues:

Art is, by its very nature, subjective.

Actually, that is entirely incorrect.  The notion that art is entirely subjective is a myth that is pushed primarily by those with no education or training in the arts.  Art has objective standards that one can be trained in and judged by.  Therefore, art cannot be entirely subjective.  It’s that simple.

Taste is subjective, art is not.

It’s perfectly reasonable to like bad movies.  Many people do; the fans and producers of MST3K for instance.  But it’s important to recognize that a movie is bad, even when it’s liked.  One of the worst movies ever made, Highlander II: The Quickening, is one of my favorites.  It’s such a clusterfarkle of bad ideas that I find it wholly entertaining to watch.  But I’m able to recognize that it’s not a good film despite the pleasure it brings me.  I don’t allow my personal taste to affect my objectivity.

I think that it is important that we as liberals not (to quote “Revenge of the Sith”) become the very thing we want to destroy. If we attack anyone who criticizes a movie that features a woman in the starring role simply because the movie features a woman in the starring role, we do ourselves a disservice. 

Yet that’s what you do anyway.  Read the sentences you wrote above about the purely imaginary points that you’re arguing against.  You cannot help yourselves.

Do I think there are probably some crazy people out there who hate “The Last Jedi” because it’s about a female Jedi, a Black stormtrooper and a Resistance led by women and people of color? Yes, of course, there are those people. But those people probably also hated the similarly diverse “The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One” and neither of those movies created the kind of division that “The Last Jedi” did.

And yet, genuine posts that openly state such things can’t be found.  We can’t be certain that the few that have been pointed to aren’t posted by SJW activists perpetrating a hate hoax in order to prove a point that doesn’t exist, as was the case with the De-Feminized Fan Edit.

My issues with “The Last Jedi” involve basically every single part of the film, but what I do not have any issue with is the casting or the nature of the characters. Far from it, I believe these characters and these actors have been severely underserved by the story they were given. 

I agree, and have said so multiple times on this blog.

She is a gifted actress who had a great character in the first movie that I believe was wasted in “The Last Jedi.”

Her character really wasn’t any better in The Force Awakens, once the nostalgia goggles are removed.

Rey basically sits on the sidelines for the entire third act of the film, in which Luke Skywalker and Kylo Ren take center stage. Her entire storyline revolves around needing a man to bring back to the fight (first Luke, then Kylo).

Yes, but she then gets to lecture that man about what he’s done and why he did it, as though she were there or has any wisdom of her own, then prances off as Yoda informs the audience that she already knows everything in the Jedi books.  But remember, she’s not a Mary Sue.

I don’t believe that “The Last Jedi” is bad because it stars a woman.

Nobody does.  But it probably makes you feel bold to type that sentence out anyway.

I believe that it is bad because it doesn’t feature its main character (who happens to be a woman) nearly enough. It makes Rey into an agent of Luke and Kylo’s storylines, rather than using them as supporting players in hers.  

All Luke did was milk some alien nipples and project a Force Doppelganger.  Are you sure that you understand the distinction between main and supporting characters?  Do you know what an ensemble is?

“The Last Jedi” wants to be seen as the most progressive and forward-thinking “Star Wars” yet, but in the last act of the film, it gives up on all of that to fall back on everything it claims it wants to forget. The film purports to be about realizing your heroes were flawed and not looking for an old man to come and face down an entire evil army, and then at the end of the movie Luke Skywalker comes out of hiding to face down an entire evil army. 

In the lamest fashion possible.

Seemingly the entire point of Benicio Del Toro’s character was to show that this isn’t a conflict with straight lines of good and evil, but one filled with shades of grey. And yet at the end of the movie, we are left with good guys vs. bad guys, one side that blows up planets and one side that saves lives. Rey and Kylo Ren are supposedly conflicted characters grappling with the darkness and light inside of them, but at the end of the movie Rey is unquestionably good and Kylo is unquestionably evil. There is no moral ambiguity about the ending of “The Last Jedi.”

That’s the result of stupidly insisting on a fan-ficish “remnants of the Empire” scenario.  Good vs. evil is the only possible outcome in that setting.

Even the movie’s attempts to critique the Han Solo archetype Poe Dameron fell flat on its face. While he is chastised early on for having a dumb plan that gets a few people killed, he later initiates an even dumber plan that leads to all but 10 members of the Resistance getting killed and nobody seems to care.

Not even the women in charge who lead all but a dozen or so Resistance fighters to their deaths.

Regardless, we should be able to have a conversation about a movie about space wizards who can make rocks move and fly through space without becoming mortal enemies in the process. 

Ahh.  The commonly parroted “space wizards” remark.  The remark that demonstrates that SJWs should never have been allowed anywhere near this franchise.  Before the Sequel Trilogy was released, Lucasfilm advertised TFA as “The Cinematic Event of a generation.”  Now that the franchise sucks thanks to ridiculous things like Kal-Leia, it’s just a movie about “space wizards with laser swords.”  Go read some Joseph Campbell for Pete’s sake, will ya?

Seriously though, a reasonable conversation with people who make and perpetuate false accusations in an effort to protect political messaging is highly unlikely.

But then again, I hated the movie, and from what I understand that must mean I just didn’t get it.

Or that you’re racist, sexist, and/or misogynist.

I understand that Harris is trying to articulate his dislike of the film from his liberal point of view.  But pay close attention to the nature of his complaints.  For Harris, the film wasn’t liberal enough.  If Harris had his way, the film would be far far worse.  So much so that he might have even named the main character Rey Bechdella.

hqdefault

Some fashion glasses would help make The Last Jedi more liberal.

Thanks to SC Reviews for finding this article.

The Social Justice Repulsion Effect Takes Hold Of The Star Wars Franchise

SJW politics naturally destroys any cultural institution that it infects.  SJW ideology is quite literally a cultural cancer; a fact that is easily demonstrated.

We’ve seen that truth expressed in the lowest rated televised Oscars in history.  We’ve seen it in the waning sales of Marvel Comics, and the subsequent replacement of Marvel’s SJW Editor in Chief as a result.  We’ve seen it in the slide of NFL viewership, and the MLB replacing the NFL as America’s most popular sportWe’ve seen it in the decline of Sports Illustrated subscriptions.  We’ve seen it in the declining ratings of ESPN, which had to fire 100 employees as a result.  We’ve seen it in the plummeting ratings of Late Night talk shows which have taken to lecturing their audience rather than entertaining or enlightening them.  We’ve seen it in declining Box Office at the cinema which has also increasingly chosen to lecture its audience with deeply ignorant SJW politics.  Anyone who doubts that people in the American entertainment industry are political activists rather than artists, can read about how Hollywood screenwriters are now coaching progressive political candidates.  We’ve seen it in SJW controlled universities and colleges which are experiencing big drops in enrollment.  We’ve seen it in East Berliners risking their lives to cross the infamous Berlin Wall in an attempt to escape East Berlin.  We’ve seen it in the SJW controlled city of Detroit, from which so many people have fled that their downtown skyscrapers are abandoned.  We’ve seen it in the blue state of California, from which the middle class is fleeing.  We’ve seen it in nations like Venezuela where thousands of formerly well-to-do people are fleeing the disastrous effects of the nation’s newly formed leftist SJW government.

Wherever SJW politics are imposed, normal people will understandably flee.  It’s a universal constant both in the micro and in the macro.

And this isn’t just anecdotal hyperbole.  Matt Philbin from NewsBusters.org reports:

According to new data from a McLaughlin & Associates/Media Research Center national poll of 1,000 likely voters:

75% agree with the statement, “When I watch live sports or entertainment shows on television I am trying to get away from politics and do not want to be bombarded with partisan political messages.”

Given that normal people also sought to escape the same kinds of worthless cultural re-education in Soviet gulags, this should come as no surprise.

Since the SJW contagion has now metastasized within Lucasfilm, we can fully expect to see what I call the Social Justice Repulsion Effect happen with the Star Wars franchise as well.  In fact, it has already begun.

Martin Daubney of The Telegraph writes in an editorial entitled, Liberal identity politics has ruined Star Wars for the fanboys:

Has the peculiarly Earthling curse of liberal identity politics infected even galaxies far, far away? It would appear so, if a growing fanboy backlash to Star Wars: The Last Jedi is to be believed.

Since its release at the weekend, a remarkable gulf has emerged between professional critics and the general viewing public’s scoring of the movie – as illustrated by that modern barometer of movies, Rotten Tomatoes. On the review aggregation site, the professionals give the movie an impressive average score of 93pc; while fans score it a more Luke-warm 55pc.

What’s going on? It appears this huge discrepancy can be attributed not to its plot – described as “having more holes than a Swiss cheese that shared a wedding bed with a porcupine” – but a claim the movie is no more than “social justice warrior propaganda”.

In media land, one critic gushed The Last Jedi is “the most triumphantly feminist Star Wars movie yet,” concluding it a masterpiece that possesses a “celebratory inclusiveness that seems entirely in the Jedi spirit”.

The Last Jedi has also been heralded as the first Star Wars movie that passes the Bechdel Test, a rule of thumb that asks whether a work of fiction features at least two women who talk to each other about something other than a man.

This type of analysis isn’t new. Entire books have been written on the identity politics of Star Wars, pointing out that creator George Lucas once spoke of his duty to wield a “moral megaphone” in his filmmaking. “Somebody has to tell young people what we think is a good person,” he said.

However, some feel that, since Disney bought the rights to the Star Wars franchise, this moral megaphone has become deafening.

Analysis of user comments on Rotten Tomatoes is telling. While most lasers are locked on the flick’s “terrible plot holes”, its “un forgivable” treatment of Luke Skywalker, and it being “little more than a very long Disney advert vehicle to sell merchandise,” a large voice of dissent decries its use of identity politics as a serious Force of disgruntlement.

The comments are littered with one-star reviews that read, “Politically correct to the point of boredom”; “SJW propaganda” and “I’m frustrated that feminism and diversity have made their way into this film. This has ruined Star Wars for me as well as my kids. Keep liberalism out of it and stop ruining once good things”.

Certainly, watching the movie can feel like you’re playing identity politics bingo.

Perhaps these fanboys ought to get over themselves. It’s just a movie, after all.

But the truth is that identity politics is the kryptonite that saps the joy out of all it touches. How long before Harrison Ford comes out as Trans Solo? What price a zero-emissions Millennium Falcon? Will Jabba The Hutt be called out for “fat shaming” the obese?

Will any of this make the slightest difference one of the highest-grossing movie franchise of all time? Only time will tell, but for now a social media war is raging between critics and diehard fans, an increasing number of whom seem to be saying “dead to me, the franchise is”.

The truly amusing part of this whole biofeedback machine, is that the SJWs currently staffed within Lucasfilm will see the backlash as a great success.  SJWs will delude themselves into thinking that they’re pissing off all the right people.  Who are all the right people?  I have compiled the unabridged SJW gripe list and provide it here for your convenience:

“Deplorable rich intolerant bitter clinging hate-mongering war-mongering fear-mongering privileged middle-class micro-aggressing triggering patriarchal straight sexist misogynist cisgendered hetero-normative transphobic homophobic homogeneous hegemonic racist xenophobic jingoistic nativist tea-bagging redneck hillbilly reptilian-brained binary-thinking white supremacist euro-centric male Zionist Evangelical Christian Far-Right Extreme-Right Uber-Right Ultra-Right Alt-Right NeoCon so-called conservative Republican bourgeoisie capitalist colonialist imperialist fascists.”

Of course, none of that makes any kind of coherent sense, but that’s the inherent nature of the uneducated SJW mentality that normal people have to cope with.  They’re pre-programmed to involuntarily squawk these words in response to various stimuli without regard to what the words actually mean.  In any case, the above list represents how the SJW employees at Lucasfilm view every backlasher who writes a letter, posts a blog, or uploads a video in protest to their content.  Just ask them.  They’ll tell you, if they can bear to acknowledge your existence at all.  So they’re almost guaranteed to double down on social justice messaging.

Jack Kenrick from squawker.org also identifies this phenomenon in an article entitled, Star Wars Fans Seem To Hate The Last Jedi And SJW’s Couldn’t Be Happier About It.  In it he writes:

What’s been interesting to watch in the hours since its release, is that the general public seems to be finding this the most divisive Star Wars film yet. While almost universally lauded by professional pop culture and film critics alike. The Last Jedi is seemingly not doing quite as well with the average American moviegoer. A fact many Progressive types somehow seem to be actively celebrating as proof of their own moral superiority.

Case in point this article written for Wired magazine entitled, “The Last Jedi Will Bother Some People. Good.” In which writer Angela Watercutter not so subtly informs us all that “The movie isn’t here to Make the Galaxy Great Again.” We are are told that those who don’t like “diversity” should not see the film. Of course as is now standard practice for today’s modern liberals, by diversity they don’t mean a variety of thought but rather simply superficial differences in skin color. None of this is too surprising however when you consider the original title of the now modified story was actually, “The Last Jedi Will Be To Inclusive for Some People. Good.”

It would seem that the average moviegoer doesn’t appreciate an obviously politicized half hours worth of pointless subplot. Which is frustratingly what the film provides, as almost the entirety of the genuinely forced “Progressive” parts of the movie take place in an oddly out of place subplot, that ultimately feels like it lacks any real purpose beyond simply pleasing SJW types. 

UPDATE:

Immediately upon publishing this blog post, I discovered that SC Reviews was discussing another article that echoes many of the same things I’ve been writing about on this blog.  Paul Cheung writes an article at fee.org entitled, “The Last Jedi” and the Politicization of Storytelling.  In it, he writes:

Has identity politics created a dilemma for the Disney Empire?

There’s been a disturbance in the franchise: Ambivalence, rather than anticipation, has characterized the online response to Disney’s announcement of the deluge of new Star Wars projects we are to be saturated with over the next several years. And while the trailer for Solo: A Star Wars Story (scheduled for May) was expected to be received with some misgiving, many fans are actively rooting for it to flop.

There’s already an over-abundance of online rants analyzing The Last Jedi’s shortcomings as a piece of entertainment. But it is in the realm of the ideas where the division between critics and audiences is most stark. Dozens of articles praise the film’s perceived socio-political commentary while countless viewers decry it for the very same reason.

One reason is that archetypes and the mythic storytelling form never lose relevance. They are timeless and universal. By contrast, loading a film with political messaging for 2018, using it as a vessel to comment on current events, makes its relevance transient. Ironically, Johnson’s attempt to “update” the saga is precisely what caused his entry to feel dated at an accelerated pace.

And it isn’t just the film’s detractors who observe the current American political climate’s bearing on the way it was written. GQ UK gleefully claims “The Last Jedi takes on Trump”. Other articles, such as these in The Independent, The Guardian, and Wired, insinuate that anyone not on board is an “alt-right” hater of diversity.

While the controversy may appear to be an inordinate fuss over “light entertainment,” Star Wars (whether by chance or intention) has come to represent something far more significant than that.

Throughout history, stories have functioned as one of the most effective societal-shaping tools. The themes, ideals, and values communicated in stories have simultaneously reflected and molded the cultures which produced them. This is what Victor Hugo was alluding to when he wrote, “England has two books: the Bible and Shakespeare. England made Shakespeare, but the Bible made England.”

Descriptions of Star Wars as “generation-defining” are also allusions to the power of stories to shape who we are. And therein lies the problem: Johnson’s work, while managing to imitate the aesthetic of Star Wars (stormtroopers, lightsabers, etc.) is a hollow husk bearing only surface similarity to its parent material. Its shallow identity politics reflect a cultural hegemony adrift from deeper moorings.

Such an incoherent set of half-baked ideas wouldn’t matter if not for the fact that they are being propagated on an industrial scale, becoming almost ubiquitous in U.S. and UK entertainment.

In a scene in The Last Jedi which practically invites the type of historical parallelism above, there’s an attempted book-burning (ignited by Yoda, no less) broadcasting the film’s overarching theme of abandoning the past.

“Let the past die. Kill it if you have to,” Kylo urges Rey, even as Johnson urges the audience to “let the past die” so that we can embrace his Star Wars and, at a broader cultural level, the ideas his film promulgates.

With the backlash to The Last Jedi, the values in the background of Johnson’s film have been inadvertently thrust into the spotlight, exposing greater popular discomfort with them than anyone anticipated.

UPDATE:

SC Reviews offers his own perspective on the Telegraph article:

Yoda To Shower Rey With Love And Kisses In Episode IX

WARNING: RUMOR

A purported “insider” tells New York Daily News, that Yoda’ will return in Episode IX in service of this dying franchise.

“Star Wars” producers are planning to bring back Yoda, according to a source familiar with Episode Nine of the storied franchise.

“The success of the scenes featuring Yoda in ‘The Last Jedi’ were huge,” says our insider. If all goes according to plan, the sci-fi space sage will rejoin the series in spirit to mentor a young warrior played by British actress Daisy Ridley, we’re told.

The insider does not define success.

“Yoda will again appear as a ghost as he acknowledges Rey’s success and growth as a Jedi,” we hear. “The scenes are due to be put together later this year.”

No doubt Yoda will gush with unconditional praise for Rey’s ability to use the Force to learn about the Force and train in the Force.  It’s just the sort of thing that a fan-fic propagandist would contrive.

Yoda

If his body hadn’t vanished, they’d be flogging his dead corpse.

In related news, Daisy Ridley doesn’t think that Rey has any weaknesses, and that the character is not a Mary Sue.