20 Points That Slumming Through SJW “Think” Pieces Teaches Us

So I’ve been pouring over SJW “think” pieces for several months now.  Given that SJWs mostly all think alike, there are some common themes that run through their articles.  So there’s something of genuine value to learn here, with regards to increasing the effectiveness of our arguments.

SJW

1. THEY LOVE CITING THE LAST JEDI’S 1.3 BILLION DOLLAR EARNINGS, BUT WON’T ACKNOWLEDGE FINANCIAL FAILINGS

I’ve written here about the waning box office for The Last Jedi immediately after the opening weekend.  I’ve pointed out that in China, where people have no nostalgic attachment to the franchise, it was perceived as garbage.  The waning toy and merchandise sales point to further problems.  Not one SJW is able to acknowledge any of this.  They’re somehow under the impression that Star Wars is too big to fail, that it will always be around no matter what, and that it will always make money.  This may be that many of them aren’t old enough to remember a time without Star Wars, so they can’t imagine life without it.  They haven’t seen the Flash Gordon and Buck Rogers franchises come and go.  They haven’t witness the slow fading of the Star Trek franchise from its height in the mid 1990s.  So they think that Star Wars is forever, when in fact, nothing is.

2. THEY DON’T UNDERSTAND THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN FEMINIST IDEOLOGY AND THE FEMALE GENDER

When someone criticizes Disney Star Wars for its heavy handed feminist messaging, the SJW will use that as an opportunity to call the critic a sexist and/or misogynist.  But remember, in 2018 feminism and the female gender are no longer inextricably linked.  Thanks to SJW activistsmen now routinely and proudly proclaim themselves to be feminists.  So feminist ideology and the female gender are two different things in the modern era.  Criticism of feminism, does not automatically translate into de facto criticism of the women in the 21st Century.

3. THEY’RE UNDER THE IMPRESSION THAT THERE WERE NO FEMALE OR MINORITY CHARACTERS BEFORE THE SEQUEL TRILOGY

Time and time again they talk about diversity in the Sequel Trilogy as though it’s a brand new thing in Star Wars.  When discussing diversity in Star Wars, they almost never mention Samuel L. Jackson, or Temuera Morrison.  They rarely mention Billy Dee Williams.  This is why they stupidly call critics racists, sexists, and/or misogynists; they don’t think females or minorities have ever been in the films before 2015.  Some of the brighter ones will argue that they’re talking about a primary character.  But that betrays the fact that they haven’t really watched the films, because the films were always ensemble pieces without a singular primary character.

4. THEY TRY TO DISMISS THE BACKLASH AS A “TINY VOCAL MINORITY”

Early on, few if any of them refused to acknowledge that the backlash even existed.  But as the backlash grew louder, and they were forced to acknowledge it, they then attempted to dismiss it as a “tiny vocal minority.”  The truth is more likely that it is they, who are in the minority.  And that’s why just as of this week they’ve taken to openly attacking and admonishing backlashers.  They’e gone so far as to mischaracterize Backlashers as racists and misogynists, despite the fact that the Backlash itself is diverse.

5. THEY’RE UNDER THE DELUSION THAT DISNEY SAVED STAR WARS

Many of them seem to feel that the Star Wars franchise was going nowhere until Disney purchased it.  They feel this despite a highly successful Clone Wars television series on the air, and the Sequel Trilogy already being developed by Lucasfilm prior to the Disney purchase.

6. THEY ACCUSE BACKLASHERS OF FEELING ENTITLED

This after they screamed to the high heavens with their own entitlement for equal representation and gender equality when Disney bought the franchise.  This despite the fact that a war time setting doesn’t really warrant perfect gender equality, since it’s primarily men who fight wars.

7. SJWs AREN’T JUST IN THE FANDOM, THEY’RE ALSO WITHIN LUCASFILM

It’s a sad fact that Lucasfilm currently employs political activists rather than artists.  We’ve seen this truth not only in the new material they’re producing under Disney, but also in the public comments from Lucasfilm representatives as well.

8. THEY WILL LIKE ANYTHING THAT PUSHES A POLITICAL AGENDA THEY AGREE WITH, WITHOUT REGARD TO ACTUAL FILM CRAFT

This goes both for SJW fans and professional critics.

9. THEY WEIRDLY ASSUME THAT THEY HAVE SOME KIND OF AUTHORITY

A number of articles have called for a “ceasefire” from the BacklashWhen so doing, they start taking this authoritative tone, instructing Backlashers what is or is not acceptable forms of criticism.  As amusing as it is, it’s important to remind them of the reality that they have no authority over anything.

10. THEY CAN’T COPE WITH CONFLICTING ROTTEN TOMATOES SCORES

They’ll attribute The Last Jedi audience score to Russian bots and racist/misogynist hackers, but can’t explain why Black Panther’s score and public reception wasn’t also affected by the same phantoms.  They’re unable to comprehend, that one was a bad movie, and that they other was good.  Occam’s Razer and all of that.

11.  THEY HAVE A SERIOUS MISUNDERSTANDING OF BASIC POLITICS

Both the SJW fans and the SJWs within Lucasfilm, think they’re “Resisting” President Trump. What’s Trump’s agenda?  The GOP/Republican agenda.  What’s the GOP/Republican agenda?  Smaller limited government.  So they’re resisting smaller limited government, which they apparently think is authoritarian fascism.  But let’s translate this into Star Wars to demonstrate how nonsensical this all is, and ask some simple questions:

So the First Order is a fascist government complete with stormtroopers. Would a fascist government support small limited government? How does one impose a fascist state with small limited government? Don’t you need big government in order to impose a fascist state?  How can you be authoritarian without a big government to back up your authority?  Who is it that supports big government?

So they’re political understanding is absolutely upside down.

MoreGovernment

12. ANTI-GUN AND ANTI-WAR SJWs HAVE BARNACLED THEMSELVES TO A FRANCHISE ABOUT…WAR

Far too often fans forget that the word “wars” appears in the title of the franchise.  Most of these SJW fans seem to think that the franchise is about cute cosplay outfits.

13. FEMINISTS SEEM TO THINK THAT LEIA PRANCED AROUND THROUGH THE ENTIRE OT IN NOTHING BUT THE GOLD BIKINI

Feminist writer after feminist writer type out silly sentences such as this:

But in the context of a franchise that has been known to use women’s bodies as an enticement for viewers it’s also a clear sign that the creators know that straight white men aren’t the only audience they’re catering to anymore.”

Not one of them seems to understand the proper context or intention of the gold bikini, which was not male audience gratification.  I’ve explained the context of Leia’s gold bikini here.

14. THEY WANT YOU TO GO FIND SOMETHING ELSE RATHER THAN VOICE PROTEST

SJWs happen to like getting indoctrinated with politics that they already agree with.  It gives them a sense of affirmation.  But with no fundamental understanding of basic economics, they don’t understand that paying customers walking away means that their political propaganda will no longer be funded.  So they tell you to go “find something else that brings you joy” or some such nonsense.  A few of them however do understand this, which is why those few attempt to shame critics into silence so they can continue to have their political propaganda funded.

15. THEY DON’T UNDERSTAND THE DISTINCTION BETWEEN POLITICAL PROPAGANDA AND GENUINE ART

Lucasfilm is currently staffed with political activists rather than genuine artists.  This is self evident to any educated thinking person.  The SJW though, sees what Lucasfilm is currently producing as art, not having any real experience or education into what political propaganda looks like.  This is why the silly Bechdel Test will determine for them whether or not they like a movie.

16. FEMINISTS THINK MEN ACT A CERTAIN WAY

When feminists attempt to be “gender equal,” many of them will put on their best performance as to what they think men act like.  We see this expressed in the character of Holdo, and to some extent, Rey.  They seem to think that men in the military go around slapping each other in the face and holding back cocky pilots all day long.  But, men don’t really act this way by and large, unless it’s really necessary.  It is truly bizarre though, that out of one side of their mouths they’ll prattle on endlessly about “toxic masculinity,” but then out of the other side of their mouth they’ll whine that they want equal representation in a war movie.  I’m not sure how they reconcile that.

17. THEY FREQUENTLY ARGUE AGAINST POINTS THAT NO ONE MAKES

Part of this is that they have some pre-rehearsed rhetoric that they’re dying to spew.  Part of it is that they want to deflect the conversation into some other area where they’re better prepared.  Part of it is that they seek to mischaracterize what you actually have said or written, into what they want people to think that you’ve said or written.  In either of these cases, it’s always equally bizarre.

18. THEY HAVE AN OBSESSED HATRED FOR STRAIGHT WHITE MALES

Nearly all of their articles cite the straight white male in some form, along with an accompanying pejorative.  That form of bigotry seems to be not just acceptable, but also highly fashionable among today’s SJW ignorati given how commonplace it is in their work.  Make no mistake, the SJWs within Lucasfilm have the same problem.

19. FEW OF THEM HAVE READ OR WATCHED ANY STAR WARS MATERIAL PRIOR TO THE SEQUEL TRILOGY

They’ll often prove this by attempting to compare Rey to Luke, and claiming that if Rey is a Mary Sue, then Luke is one too.  It’s more of that equality nonsense that they try to force onto every aspect of life.  As I explain in my review of The Force Awakens, this comparison is ridiculous, if you’ve actually watched the films.  Clearly, many have not, and are basing their opinions on brief clips, what they’ve seen at conventions, or what they’ve heard other people say or read other people write, etc.

20. SJWs will never be happy or satisfiedNot ever.

And there you have it.  These 20 points pretty much describe the main talking points in any Star Wars related SJW written article that you’ll read at any point in the future.

Desperate Fan Pleads For A Break

Buckie Wells from fansided.com appeals to fans in a piece entitled, It’s time to put Star Wars: The Last Jedi and Rian Johnson behind us.

In it he writes:

Now that Star Wars: The Last Jedi is available for digital download, everyone can debate it quietly at home while the rest of us who want to can move on.

You can move on even though some of us are still debating the matter.  What’s stopping you?

“From a certain point of view” is one of Obi-Wan Kenobi’s best lines. In fact, it’s one of the best lines in all of Star Wars. They are words to live by. And based on the fractures found in the fandom after The Last Jedi, the sentiment behind these words is the only way to move on.

There is no moving on if Kathleen Kennedy is allowed to continue producing Star Wars films until the end of time.  That’s my point of view.

Leading up the film’s premiere, many fans felt excited to see the sequel to the record-breaking The Force Awakens. We wanted to see our favorite characters again. Plus, several questions needed to be answered. The Last Jedi, however, answered next to nothing. In fact, it played like a two-hour placeholder.

Or like a 2.5 hour wait at a really crappy restaurant.

Based on the reception from fans, Rian Johnson’s vision didn’t align with what people expected, let alone fit with the foundation laid by The Force Awakens.

Rian’s vision didn’t align with basic storytelling and filmmaking.

This isn’t personal anymore. Despite my firm feelings on character development and my expectations of romance in a franchise that depicted people frolicking through the grass, actual kissing, baby-making, and one of the most overt gut-wrenching love ballads of all time, I enjoyed The Last Jedi on a superficial level.

What other level is there?

Unfortunately, when you put aside your loyalty to Star Wars and become a little more critical, The Last Jedi doesn’t hold up.

I would argue that loyalty to Star Wars is what allows one to see that The Last Jedi doesn’t hold up.

Worse, the director himself only exacerbates the problem.

The Rian Johnson Explanation Tour may have finally come to an end, now that Solo’s marketing has begun in earnest.  Then again, tomorrow is another day.

From time management issues and the lack of true development and progression, The Last Jedi is hardly the most important film in the franchise. Therefore, it really doesn’t warrant this much attention.

Unintentionally, it may very well end up being the most important film in the franchise, for all the wrong reasons.

Obviously, the only true thing that matters nowadays is that The Last Jedi made money. It didn’t make The Force Awakens money. It also didn’t perform as strongly as Black Panther. But it performed as expected for Star Wars, thus the inability to resist content expansion.

Yes, but it cooked the Golden Goose.

Goose

The Last Jedi

Moving forward, there’s no point in debating how we each like our Star Wars films. Or what we interpret from various scenes. Everything exists “from a certain point of view.” At the very least, we can certainly stop talking about The Last Jedi and focus more on Solo: A Star Wars Story. I never thought I’d be most excited for Han Solo than anything else. But I do need a break from Rian Johnson. A “Brian,” if you will. (Get it?)

We can revisit this after Episode IX hits theaters next year.

Discussion over The Last Jedi doesn’t seem to be slowing down any time soon.

 

White Dude Directing Entire Trilogy Doesn’t Want More White Dudes To Direct

While wading through Jen Yamato’s interview with Rian Johnson at the Los Angeles Times in which she refers to Backlashers as “cranky fans,” I ran across this little nugget:

As they were to his “Last Jedi” ideas, Lucasfilm seems open to shaking up the “Star Wars” universe, according to Johnson. “We need some directors who aren’t white dudes,” he said emphatically, in spite of Lucasfilm’s track record to date of hiring only white male directors. “And [Kennedy] knows it, too. It just has to happen. I mean, come on. It has to happen.”

It’s so brave and bold whenever a white dude refers to white dudes as though he himself isn’t a white dude.  Don’t you think?

So why doesn’t Rian step aside, and let people of color direct his trilogy?  Please?

Rian Johnson also had some other kernels of wisdom:

Interesting.  As Lucasfilm and Kathy are pushing it forward, toy and merchandise sales are falling behind.  Apparently Rian and Lucasfilm are under the delusion that The Last Jedi made fans feel things and engaged them in the way that those original movies did.  I guess that’s part of what makes Hollywood an island of fantasy, surrounded by a sea of reality.

Rian2

Rian patiently explains how wonderful his lame decisions are.

UPDATE:

Jeremy from Geeks + Gamers offers his own perspective on Rian Johnson’s comments:

Rian Johnson Prayed To God For This Reaction

Hugh Armitage of Digital Spy reports on the status of Rian Johnson’s new trilogy:

“I’m looking at everything right now,” he said when we asked what parts of Star Wars lore he might be drawing from. “I’m honestly just in this very nice ‘OK, what is this thing going to be?’ phase.

“Really, the only goal I have is to think about how Star Wars made me feel as a kid. And that’s it. I’m trying to capture: what is that, if it’s not iconography that we recognise, necessarily, from the original trilogy? What captures that spirit? What can be that for a kid who’s never heard of Star Wars?

“It’s getting back to the very fundamental questions of what makes this what it is.”

“When you make a movie, you only pray to God that you get this kind of passionate reaction to it,” he added. “It’s been really cool.”

Rian

Conflates passion with revulsion.

It’s interesting to note however, that Hugh Armitage is perpetuating the sexism and/or misogyny myth in his piece.  He writes:

The true essence of Star Wars is very much up for debate, as has been shown by the small but vocal minority of fans who took offence at the film’s portrayal of Luke Skywalker and the inclusion of women in the story.

No one took offense at the inclusion of women in the story.  It would be silly to, given that women have been included in the story of Star Wars since 1977.  But in parroting the standardized “tiny vocal minority” rhetoric, Hugh links to a story about The De-Feminized Fan Edit, not realizing that it was created by a feminist attempting to satirize Men’s Rights Activists.  This is the kind of problem that we have with media outlets distorting the truth.

Is Rian Johnson Getting Death Threats, or Perpetrating a Hate Hoax?

Corey Chichizola of Cinema Blend writes an article entitled, Rian Johnson Received Death Threats After Star Wars: The Last Jedi Was Released, in which he quotes Rian Johnson as saying:

“There were death threats. It’s balanced by a few things — 90 percent of the stuff I got online was not only lovely and encouraging but phenomenally thoughtful. Fans would send me essays on the movie. The other 10 percent is just loud and gets amplified. At first I was freaked out but then I realized the things people were angry about are the things I’m most proud about.”

It’s unfortunate that so many people are willing to just accept whatever Rian Johnson and other Disney representatives say at face value without question.

HateCrimeHoax-370x242

We already know that the black stormtrooper controversy was completely fabricated.   We know that Disney is not being entirely truthful about the Solo movie posters.  We also know that leftist SJW activists like Rian Johnson, are notorious for perpetrating hate hoaxes in a misguided effort to prove points that don’t exist.  Rian Johnson is likely no different, as the nature of the narrative in his movie demonstrates.

So while it’s completely inappropriate to send death threats to someone for making a bad movie, it’s also equally inappropriate to lie about the existence of death threats in order to prove some non-existent point.

This is why I would like to see the actual death threats, before taking Rian Johnson at  his word.  I strongly encourage others to question Rian Johnson’s claims as well.  Let’s see those death threats, Rian.

Rian Johnson Says TLJ Criticism Is Unfair, Mark Hamill Retweets Comments

Frank Pollata of CNN reports on an interview with Rian Johnson and Mark Hamill at the South by Southwest Conference.  I’ve written previously how it seems that Mark Hamill’s more recent comments have taken a turn against the fans, and here we get more of that.

What’s actually unfair is the effort to compare the criticism of The Last Jedi with criticism of The Empire Strikes Back as part of the larger effort to tear down the Original Trilogy, in a vain attempt to elevate the Sequel Trilogy, thereby making them both equal.  It’s vain because all one has to do is pop in the DVDs for both films and watch them, thus making any argument either way utterly meaningless.  The Last Jedi is no Empire Strikes Back.

But the argument is circling the internet anyway, and it’s always silly every time it’s repeated.

Granted, there was no internet as we know it now in the 1970s or 1980s.  But we didn’t live in caves.  We had communication.  We had fanzines.  We had Fan Clubs.  We had letters to the editors of Starlog and other publications.  We had telephones.  Heck, we even had internet bulletin boards in the 1980s.  You can watch the film War Games starring Mathew Broderick to get a sense of how that worked.  But more importantly, stars and directors received fan mail, through the old fashioned U.S. Postal Service.  Mark is old enough to know all of this.

But is the argument they’re honestly making here is that no one would know that The Last Jedi sucks were it not for the internet?  Even if that could be true, how would that be good for anyone?

Furthermore, those who have followed George Lucas’ career know that he’s always been a pretty good business man.  He produced each film with the profits he earned from the previous film.  So if The Empire Strikes Back were as poorly received as SJWs are now suddenly claiming when it’s convenient to do so, then Return of the Jedi would never have been produced.

The CNN interview continued:

RianHamill

Mark Hamill recites the contents of his Twitter feed.

Thanks for telling us how we feel, Mark.  I guess psychiatry is a Force power now.  Why not?  Everything else is.

The only people I’ve seen feel entitled, are the SJWs who have been screaming their demands at Lucasfilm as to what kind of characters and actors ought to appear on screen and in print.

I understand that for Mark Hamill his time with Disney has likely been an emotional roller coaster ride.  So I’d like to cut him some slack here.

But at some point I’d like to think that Mark Hamill will be open to considering the possibility that the movie just isn’t very good.  Blaming the fans for not liking your movie is never good policy.  Particularly not the fans who defended Mark when they thought that Disney was mistreating him.

Rian Johnson Avoids Derivatives

Sean K. Cureton of ScreenRant reports:

Taking to his personal Twitter account, Johnson took the time to respond to the query of a Star Wars fan who was specifically worried that The Last Jedi would fall prey to far too many recycled plot points and imagery. Speaking in defense of himself and the motion picture he has poured his heart and soul into, Johnson replied with the following post:

“I’ve addressed it the only way I possibly can – by spending the past three years of my life making a film I do not think is derivative.”

So, just to be clear:

The First Order Vs. The Resistance is not derivative of The Empire Vs. The Rebellion.

The Praetorian Guards are not derivative of the Emperor’s Guards.

The Supremacy is not derivative of the Executor.

X-Wings Vs. TIE Fighters is not derivative of X-Wings Vs. TIE Fighters.

The AT-M6 is not derivative of the AT-AT.

Salt is not derivative of snow.

Captain Phasma is not derivative of the Cylons.

Canto Bight is not derivative of Carillon.

BB-8 is not derivative of V.I.N.C.E.N.T.

And Porgs are not derivative of Pikachu.

Any questions?

Rian Johnson Made A Movie That He Knew People Wouldn’t Like

Hibbing Daily Tribune reports:

When asked if he was surprised his movie won, he exclusively told BANG Showbiz at the event at Camden Roundhouse, in London, Johnson, who was joined by his partner Karina Longworth, said: “I dunno. The critics were diffusive about it but I have to say the fans have been really wonderful and lovely about it.

“It’s a ‘Star Wars’ movie so not all fans are going to love anything that comes out with ‘Star Wars’ in it.

“I got to say being out there in the internet and seeing the reaction that it got in terms of the fans, the ones who didn’t like it have been vocal sometimes.

“But I’d say the ratio is about the same as the critics.”

Apparently Rian Johnson hasn’t seen the totally confirmed ratio at Rotten Tomatoes:

RottenTomatoes

Not the parallel universe that Rian Johnson is looking for.

Can’t wait to see what Rian comes up with for his own special trilogy.  ScreenRant reports:

Saying he’s excited to dive in on the project, Johnson admitted that he still has to “figure out what it’s going to be.” In a previous interview, Johnson revealed that Disney and Lucasfilm signed off on the new films even though Johnson had yet to come up with an actual story. And it sounds as though Johnson still has not settled on a story.

Maybe Rian Johnson can settle on a story that he knows people won’t like in this new trilogy too.

Rian Johnson Explains How Luke Turns Palpatine Into The Hero Of The Saga

Samuel Brace writes at FlickeringMyth.com:

One reveal that surprised fans during the movie was that Luke had cut himself off from the force and was no longer taking up an active role as a Jedi. Speaking at SXSW at an event hosted by Amazon Prime Video, Johnson explained why Luke had taken this measure:

“For me, the reason that Luke had to turn off the Force was because of Leia. Because if he didn’t, if he had a connection to Leia, if he could see his sister suffering, if he could hear her calls for help, there’s no way he’d be able to do what he thinks in his head is what he has to do – which is to stay on that island (Ach-to) for the greater good of the galaxy.”

Johnson has explained before that Luke had come to believe that the Jedi have failed the galaxy and that sequestering himself as he did, was the only way forward.

“In this way he’s able to finally do the thing he couldn’t do in Empire, which is cut off the emotional, isolate himself into what he’s convinced himself is the right thing,” said Johnson.

And why did Luke sequester himself on that Island?  To finish the job that Emperor Paltpatine had started; to end the Jedi.  Emperor Palpatine sought to do away with the Jedi too.  If Palpatine hadn’t killed most of the Jedi, then the Jedi would still be around, and Luke wouldn’t have had the opportunity to isolate himself and end the Jedi forever.  So there was no point for Obi-Wan and Yoda to train Luke as their last hope to bring back the return of the Jedi.  Yoda must now be in the same dark place that Luke is too, if he’s burning Jedi books instead of trying to bring the Jedi back.  But to be fair, Yoda’s ghost appears to be senile now anyway, so he may not even know what he’s doing.  No wonder we don’t see Obi-Wan’s ghost.  After seeing all of his efforts amount to nothing, Obi-Wan probably said “to hell with it all” and just went into the light.  If Luke had just allowed himself to either be turned or killed in the Original Trilogy, the Jedi could have ended right there, and it could have solved this problem without any need for a Sequel Trilogy.  He could have saved us all a whole lot of trouble.

SmL0Clz

Birds of a feather.

Rian Johnson’s Explanation Tour Continues

Adam Rosenberg writes a piece at Mashable entitled, Rian Johnson has a thoughtful take on Luke Skywalker’s dark ‘The Last Jedi’ journey.

It’s been said before, it’ll be said again: Let the past die. Kill it if you have to.

And it’s been said before:

 Never before have the young men had so good a right to clean up the debris of the past.”

That’s the problem with letting the past die.  Without knowing what’s been done before, you keep making the same mistakes over and over again.

Adam Continues:

That’s what Rian Johnson did.

He certainly did.

Adam quoted Rian Johnson:

“If you look at any classic hero’s myth that is actually worth its salt, at the beginning of the hero’s journey, like with King Arthur, he pulls the sword from the stone and he’s ascendant — he has setbacks but he unites all the kingdoms,” Johnson told the SXSW crowd (h/t The Hollywood Reporter).

“But then if you keep reading, when it deals with the hero’s life as they get into middle-age and beyond, it always starts to get into darker places. And there’s a reason for that: It’s because myths are not made to sell action figures; myths are made to reflect the most difficult transitions we go through in life.”

Rian makes some pretty good points here.  But the decisions themselves were never really the issue.  It was how they were executed.  Having Luke enter a darker phase of his life would have been all fine and dandy, but instead of telling us what happened he should have showed it.  In all honesty, the backstory should have been the primary focus of the Sequel Trilogy.  One of the golden rules in film craft is show rather than tell.

For all the fandom anger that chased The Last Jedi‘s release — at least some of which wasn’t about the movie, really — 

You’re referring to the purely imaginary reasons that SJW activists desperately want people to be angry about.  Remember, strong female characters have always been a part of Star Wars.  One of the primary problems in the film is the eye-rolling social justice silliness, which SJWs don’t really seem to want to directly address.

…pretty much anyone who watched the movie with both eyes open comprehended Luke’s journey.

Everyone comprehended it.  It’s just that we thought it was executed stupidly.

1200px-Rian_Johnson_by_Gage_Skidmore

Really? Tell us more about your movie.